Carbon dating chemistry

Rated 4.21/5 based on 827 customer reviews

(Coals are elemental carbon mixed with varying amounts of carbon compounds.Coke and charcoal are nearly pure carbon.) In addition to its uses in making inks and paints, carbon black is added to the rubber used in tires to improve its wearing qualities.Because it conducts electricity but does not melt, graphite is also used for electrodes in electric furnaces and dry cells as well as for making crucibles in which metals are melted.Molecules of fullerene show promise in a range of applications, including high-tensile-strength materials, unique electronic and energy-storage devices, and safe encapsulation of flammable gases, such as hydrogen.Carbon generally forms four covalent bonds with other atoms in larger molecules.Atomic number 6; atomic weight 12.011; sublimation point above 3,500°C; boiling point 4,827°C; specific gravity of amorphous carbon 1.8 to 2.1, of diamond 3.15 to 3.53, of graphite 1.9 to 2.3; valence 2, 3, 4.Q-carbon, which is created by rapidly cooling a sample of elemental carbon whose temperature has been raised to 4,000 K (3,727 °C [6,740 °F]), is harder than diamond, and it can be used to manufacture diamond structures (such as diamond films and microneedles) within its matrix. Each of the “amorphous” forms of carbon has its own specific character, and, hence, each has its own particular applications.All are products of oxidation and other forms of decomposition of organic compounds.

Although widely distributed in nature, carbon is not particularly plentiful—it makes up only about 0.025 percent of Earth’s crust—yet it forms more compounds than all the other elements combined.

Carbon is the cosmic product of the “burning” of helium, in which three helium nuclei, atomic number 4, fuse to produce a carbon nucleus, atomic number 12.

In the crust of Earth, elemental carbon is a minor component.

Carbon is widely distributed as coal and in the organic compounds that constitute petroleum, natural gas, and all plant and animal tissue.

A natural sequence of chemical reactions called the carbon cycle—involving conversion of atmospheric carbon dioxide to carbohydrates by photosynthesis in plants, the consumption of these carbohydrates by animals and oxidation of them through metabolism to produce carbon dioxide and other products, and the return of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere—is one of the most important of all biological processes.

Leave a Reply